INDEX

Year Ago

April 2017

The Amateur Birder's Journal - Stories & Photographs by J R Compton
Redraw Screen Often [control or command r]; I change this page nearly every day.
The current Bird Journal is always here

150 photos so far this month. Cameras Used  Ethics  Feedback red diamond My Other Bird Pages: Herons  Egrets  Heron v, Egrets  Links & Bird Books  Pelican Beak Weirdness  Pelicans Playing Catch  Bird Rouses  Courtship Behaviors  Banding  Birding Galveston 2015 & 2013  The 2nd Lower Rio Grande Valley Birds page  & the 1st  Bald Eagles at White Rock red diamond Coyotes red diamond JR's resumé Contact red diamond Dallas Bird Resources: red diamond Dallas Audubon's Bird Chat red diamond Bird Rescue Info You want to use my photos?  How to Photograph Birds  Bird Places: Bird-annotated Map of White Rock Lake & the Med School Rookery & Village Creek Drying Beds Please do not share these images on Pinterest, Tumblr or other image-sharing sites!

I sometimes post other photographers' bird pix here when I am at a loss for my own, and I will watermark their pix with the photographer's notice and web URL. Email up to three jpeg images of one-meg each to jrcompton 23 @ att.net (no spaces) with your name (as you want it to appear) & the bird species in the file name. And the words Bird Journal Submission in the Subject. Please also tell me the City & State where you photographed them.

Best Pix This Month : Rogers Wildlife Rehab red diamond The SW Med School Rookery red diamond Anhingas @ The Rookery red diamond Speed Preening Barn Swallow(s) red diamond A Scissor-tailed Flycatcher & Wood Duck in Action red diamond Bird Abstracts red diamond Snowy Egrets & Great-tailed Grackles Displaying  red diamond  Red-shouldered Hawks Guarding Their Nest  red diamond  Recently-hatched Barred Owlets Playing in Trees  red diamond  Some Other People's Excellent Photographs 

Sometimes I Just Need to Experiment — posted early April 30

 Double-crested Cormorant Fishing - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Double-crested Cormorant Fishing

One of my many favorite spots to find birds fishing is on the North side of the so-called "Big Thicket" area. Especially in the water on the shore-side of the lake along Yacht Club Row.

Once It Was A Dragon Boat - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Once It Was A Dragon Boat

I think I've seen this boat with dragon heads on both ends. From where I wanted to stand to take this picture, this was as much of it as I could get in with the telephoto lens. But there were no dragon heads on either end this time.

Hidden Creek, Shaky Hands - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Hidden Creek

I've never before been as satisfied by one of my photographs of this creek through the north end of where the lake used to be before the forest grew there and back when many of the commercial establishments along Northwest Highway were named after the lake that used to be closer.

About ten years ago, I wandered through the treed area just north of the Mockingbird Car Bridge and found people living in the woods. I haven't explored that area since, but I've been thinking about it.

White Rock Paddle Company - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

White Rock Paddle Company

I was after the colors, especially the vivid oranges and reds of the stacked-up kayaks, but having someone in the middle of all that vividness wearing a T-shirt of the color-wheel-opposite color makes it all worthwhile.

Another Borrowed Fashion Shoot - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Another Borrowed Fashion Shoot

When I first saw them, I wondered what they heck they were up to. I didn't see the photographers until later as I drove The Slider out of the parking lot. I keep feeling the need to explain that White Rock Lake Park is a public place, and anyone may photograph anything there. because everything and everybody there is in public.

Maybe they are selling umbrellas. The trick about shooting people in public places is that we cannot make fun of them or use our pix of them to sell something. You'll notice that there are either no ads on my site, or any of those dreadful things were put there — or allowed there — by you.

Zero Tree -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

The Zero Tree

I've talked about this tree before, and I'm not at all sure this is my first photograph of this part of it.

Dog Park from the Other Side -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Dog Park from The Other Side

Where the City of Dallas teaches people with dogs that it's okay to have dogs at the lake without leashes, and it's also just fine to let leash-less dogs loose in the water anytime and anyplace people with dogs want to — despite all those signs that claim it's not okay. I especially like the half of a dog on the far left and the guy with arms akimbo and somewhat less than half a dog on the far right.

Flagpole Hill Flag Profile -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Flagpole Hill Flag Profile

I just got close enough to nearly fill the frame with my usual 500mm approximation and kept shooting, moving the camera to try to keep the whole flapping flag in the frame. It assumed many shapes, and I just kept shooting till I needed to stop. My father was a Colonel in the Air Force, and I was a buck private. I love our flag.

Boxed Flag on a Tall Pole -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Wind-Boxed Flag

I shot 16 pictures of the flag on Flagpole Hill flapping in the strong breeze. I'd never before thought about doing that, but once I crossed Northwest Highway into the hills and creeks of that area, it quickly became something of a necessity. These are my two favorites. Today.

 

 

Blue-winged Teal, Bathing Duck, Distressed Coot, Handsome RWBB
& E Kingbird — Photographed April 28 & posted very early April 29

 Male Blue-winged Teal Across the Lagoon - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Blue-winged Teal Across Sunset Lagoon

I didn't find out till later that night that an eagle had been seen in Sunset Bay a couple weeks ago, but I was just looking and hoping for something. Anything interesting.

Male and Female Blue-winged Teal Closer -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male and Female Blue-winged Teal To the Right of the Pier at Sunset Bay

I stayed out on the pier for about an hour Friday. It seemed like it was going to be a cool day, but it kept getting hotter, especially out on the pier. From whence there didn't seem to be much of interest at first, but as I telescoped in all directions, in and out of the bay from there, I kept finding interesting little avian tidbits.

These may be related to the Blue-winged Teal above, but they are not the same birds. Nice, however, of them to get this close to shore. Usually, they do not. I'm hoping they'll stay around long enough that I'll get some flying pix, so we'll all see why they are called "blue-winged" Teal.

White Duck Bathing - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

White Duck Bathing Off to the Left of the Pier

I still enjoy watching a bird splashing a bath, and I almost always want to photograph it. This was at just the right distance and relative positioning.

Coot Attempting Escape - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Coot Attempting Escape

Anna and I could see the thin fishing line (we assumed) this coot had got stretched across its wings in the water, but the camera could not. But it was there, and first it, then us, continued to freak out the coot. We were just standing there with cameras, but American Coots are ever skittish. Its Coot friends had left the area soon as we came down the hill on the point of Winfrey, but the line seemed to be holding this coot's wings apart and in position just a few feet from shore, and it was in a big hurry to get out.

Coot Attempting Escape - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Coot Swimming Away with Wings Out

Eventually, with all its frightened thrashing, the coot got the line loose from across its wings and whatever was holding it to shore and, still very much distressed, began to make significant progress out from shore. I was about to step into the water (yuck!) and see if I could help, when it snapped loose and began swimming rapidly away.

I shot these on Anna's camera without checking anything (my usual practice, unfortunately) and the episode was over by the time I got exposure to my liking. Luckily, severe underexposure can more likely be saved than overexposure.

Male Red-winged Blackbird -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Red-winged Blackbird

I was waiting for it to wail away with one of his proclamations — "I am here; Where are you?". But I may even like this shot better. Vivid color, lots of fine detail…

Western Kingbird, I'm Guessing -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Eastern Kingbird

It's just about the time of season for Eastern Kingbirds to be appearing. The white patterns on their black wings don't seem quite right for the Kingbirds in Sibley's or my other I.D books, but I don't know who else it would be. I hope some more knowledgeable readers will be willing to share their knowledge. Then someone did: Kala King set me straight on E Kingbird, not W, although I knew that all along, just got it confused here. And here (points to brain), and she identified the plant as a Yucca bloom stalk.

 

 

Same Red-shouldered Hawk Nest + Miscellaneous Lake Photos —
photographed April 27 & posted very early April 28

Red-shouldered Hawk Flies Down from Nest - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Parental Red-shouldered Hawk Flies Down from Nest

Then, because I was still in The Slider (usually remembering that birds are very rightfully afraid of humans, but not nearly enough afraid of cars — or humans in cars), I kept clicking, but this was, by far, the best shot of the day. And yeah, I understand the nest (that I had the camera/lens trained on, is in solid focus, but the Red-shouldered Hawk is not. And maybe, if I had been ready for it to jump down off to the right side of the nest and fly off, I might have got it sharp, but I'm astounded that I got this much.

Other Parental Unit Staring Down - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

The Other Parental Unit Stares Down at Us

Then, after posing so perfectly like this, she flew away, also. I was already hoping she wouldn't, but she did. I'm only guessing at her sex. I can sometimes tell by looking at birds, or by know who sits the nest. I was startled and surprised when the other parental unit swooped down. Then this one did the same. I was more or less ready for those sudden flights, but there were several tree branches full of green leaves between me and them, so the other pix are only her feet sticking out of the dark areas. But this was worth the stress.

Such a handsome bird.

Charles Fussell Being Interviewed by The Press - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Charles Fussell Being Interviewed by The Press

Charles is who feeds the gooses (and any other birds — gooses, duckses and any other species fierce enough to brave the onslaught) at the lake several times a day, and he bought nearly all the gooses that are left in the flock that has become the de facto lawn-mowers at Sunset Bay.

We didn't hear his interview, but we know that recently, yet another much-loved goose got poached — in broad daylight and while humans watched, and there's been a big hubbub about it. A lot more gooses disappear right before Christmas and Thanksgiving and other big bird-eating holidays.

There was a game warden who parked her truck down along DeGoyler Drive, but who was never seen where a lot of birds gathered — i.e., Sunset Bay. So we don't know if she just gave up — or what. We thought she was nice, but wondered how she expected to slow poaching from there.

Dallas Water Utilities Employee mapping the old water system that's going to be replaced - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Dallas Water Utilities Employee Surveying The Old Water Line

He's surveying the old water pipes, many of which will be replaced. I hope they manage to divert the water that flows down from the Aborectum, under Lawther Drive near the base of Winfrey Hill. I understand from someone who actually tested that refuse that it contains many harmful substances. But then, so does our lake.

And just a few days ago, I saw a happy family playing barefoot among the rocks just before it goes under the trail on that dangerous water's trip out into White Rock Lake. Should I have warned them? Last time I warned anyone like that, they yelled at me.

Mockingbird on Shrub -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Mockingbird on Shrub

Our  and about four other state's state bird is the amazing, singing Mockingbird, who learn their repertoire from their grandparents. It's been awhile since I've photographed them, but I really like having them around. Someday, I'm going to manage to train a telephoto video camera on a Mockingbird flying toward me, getting bigger and bigger, and having those flashing stripes on its wings, get vivid and vivider.

Close-up of Monk Parakeet -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Close-up of Monk Parakeet

Oh, so rarely do our parakeets (definitely not Parrots) get this close to humans or cars of us. Comparatively wonderful detail, and it's obviously in the midst of chewing food.

Adult Male Eastern Brown-headed Cowbird -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Male Eastern Brown-headed Cowbird

Wish I could have captured all three together, but while I watched and waited, they never once did that.

Not Sure, but I assume this is a juvenile, then female Brown-headed Cowbird -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

I'm Not Exactly Sure, But I assume these are a Juvenile,
then half an Adult Female Brown-headed Cowbird

I'm more certain of the adult female than the juvenile. But who else would be hanging out with her so close?

Adult Male Breeding European Starling - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Male Breeding European Starling

Some birders stay angry with these Starlings, because they were brought here where they supposedly had no natural enemies, and thus they over proliferated all across this country. I have, however, seen and photographed predation on them, but I guess, sooner or later, everybody earns some enemies.

 

 

The Red-shouldered Hawk's Nest I've been Scouting Has Two New Chicks,
Maybe More — Photographed & posted April 25, 2017

Parent and two Red-shouldered Hawk Chicks in the nest - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved. 132

Two White Red-shouldered Hawk Chicks and Maternal Parental Unit in Nest

I go by this nest almost every day — sometimes three or four times, just checking on their progress. I probably should say I "go under" it, since the best way to find the exact spot is to back and front up under the nest in "The Slider" (my elderly Prius that's now getting 53.3 miles per gallon, and I'm so proud…). There may actually be more than two chicks, but two is all I could see in these careful shots.

Two New Red-shouldered Hawk Chicks and Various Parts of their Parent or Parents - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Two New Red-shouldered Hawk Chicks and Various Parts of their Parents

I had got worried when part of their careful nest got blown down the other side of the tree, but I keep seeing mom sitting the nest, and today, finally, I saw fuzzy white hawk chicks. In this pic, I believe I see the two chicks and at least one parental Red-shouldered Hawk.

Two New Red-shouldered Hawks in Neest -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.
Two, new, Red-shouldered Hawk Chicks in Nest

Please note that both chicks' eyes are sharp in focus. Us bird photographers get excited when that happens, although it's comparatively rare, and hardly necessary, except in the eyes and minds of amateurs, of which I am one.

More parental Red-shouldered Hawk Dad pix below on this page.

 

 

The Southwest Medical Center Rookery
Shot April 23 & posted late April 24

Starting with Cattle Egrets

Cattle Egret under Construction Derrick - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.  

Cattle Egret under Construction Derrick

There's always lots of construction going on around the corner of Inwood Road and Harry Hines Boulevard, approximately where the med school rookery is, and I've been wanting to do more and more juxtaposing of birds with those cranes, derricks, towers and other construction objects. Now that I've seen what it looks like, however, I might not want to do it again, but it was an interesting attempt.

Adult Breeding Cattle Egret Flying Over Construction - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Cattle Egret Over Construction

Yes, Cattle Egrets are those small white birds who follow cows around in fields. They come to this — and many other rookeries — to pick mates and hatch new generations.
 

Today, I hoped to capture at least one each of the following species at the rookery:

Birds & Expectations  —  Sunday April 23, 2017

Tricolored Heron: only one, and that one mostly by accident. I didn't know what species I'd shot till much later. Then I was surprised. When I'm photographing flying birds from the top of the parking garage, I take whoever flies over, then sort them out later. It's generally a rapid-fire exercise.

Anhinga: lots today

Cattle Egret: lots today

Great Egret: Way plenty

Little Blue Heron: one or two

Snowy Egret — only one that I saw, and I didn't realize who it was then. I didn't really expect to see a Snowy. Turned out I got at leas one of every species I'd hoped for. And I'm certainly not used to getting this high a percentage of what I sought, but I'll take it.

White Ibis: just a few in plain sight
 

Cattle Egret Over - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Breeding Cattle Egret Over

In years past, I've often seen adult breeding Cattle Egrets raise very large crowns to show that they are big, bad, adult and breeding, but though I've been watching for them, I have yet to see them do that this year, either in Dallas or in San Antonio.

Cattle Egrets are 19-21 inches long with wingspans of about three feet. Great Egrets are 3 to 3.5 feet long with wingspans of 4 feet.
 

Great Egrets

Great Egret Flyover - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Great Egret Flyover

there's very probably more Great Egret adults and chicks at this rookery than any other species. Especially now, since it's been pleasantly cool — if not downright cold — nights.

Adult Breeding Great Egret Preening -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult, Breeding and here Preening Great Egret

Great Egret in Breeding Plumes - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Great Egret shot through a tree and something else

Obviously the same Great Egret in the same place, showing off its Breeding Plumes.

Great Egret Showing Back-lighted Filligree -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Great Egret Showing Filigree

This photo started out somewhat darker, and I didn't see the egret's head among the black when I shot it, so I neatly cropped off its beak

Parent and — I think — a juvenile Great Egret -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult and (I think) at least one juvenile Great Egret

At one point in that early afternoon, Anna pointed west toward the other parking garages along that side of campus, and said she wanted to find Great Egret chicks, and I wondered where could possibly be more than were right there at the Memorial on the north side of the rookery, where I photographed these. But she found much more wonderful nests of birds over there. See the Anhingas above.
 

Anhingas — Lots of Anhingas

Anhinga Flying Past Construction Towers.

Adult Anhinga Flying Past Construction Derricks

anhingas are often more easily identified from the back. Anhingas are 2.5 to 3 feet long with wingspans of about 4 feet. And they're mostly dark.

First-year Anhinga Flyover

Great detail. This is my first photo in which I have noticed the flaring gray-black lines emanating from their beaks, back under their heads. This one is not an adult male, let alone breeding. Wing-feather details change between juveniles and adult females, but since I can't see this one's top, I can't apply the little ignorance I have on that subject.

Front View of Anhinga Flying - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Front View of Anhinga Flying

This must have been taken from the top of the Free Parking Garage, because I cannot fly, and there's no other way to get up even with a flying Anhinga. I am only very slowly learning how to recognize their various sexes and ages. Sightings of them at the rookery used to be rare. Now they're common — or at least I'm gradually figuring out where to find them and what they look like. This looks like an anhinga in flight, and I love that its orange feet transfuse light from behind. But I wish I could see more detail in, around and on its head, where it might or might not help me identify its relative age.

Adult Breeding Anhingas in or near nest - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Anhingas in or near a nest

These were pointed to me as juveniles. But juveniles — and still confusingly to me, adult females — have brown necks and heads, and adult males — breeding or not, have this colored (black, mottled with brown or tan) heads. So the lower, farther-back one here may well be either a juvenile or a female, but the upper one is more probably an adult male. And I never did see the nest, which to my meagre knowledge, are small and well-camouflaged. Breeding Adult males and females have blue orbital rings — circles of unfeathered skin surrounding their eyes, like the upper one here.

Adult Breeding Male Anhinga - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Breeding Male Anhinga "in nest"

I suspect this one is the same one upper in the pic above. The brownish-black blob below it here might be a juvenile.

Anhinga in Top of Bare Tree - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Breeding Male in Leafless Tree

As photographed through several other, leafed trees.

Anhinga in Flight from Above - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Male Anhinga in Flight from Above

I really did not expect to photograph this many anhingas.

Tri-colored Heron

Tricolored Heron Flying Toward Construction Towers - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Tri-colored Heron Flying Toward Construction Derrick

i had it in my mind that I wanted to go up the free parking tower across the street from the outdoor gym that's surrounded by the rookery before we started walking the grounds. Not exactly sure why, really. Just had it in my mind to do that first this time, instead of after shooting for a couple hours, like we usually do. That five-floor Free Parking garage almost due South of the rookery is great for photographing flying birds up close — or at least way up closer than from the ground.

That's probably why some of today's flying birds seem to be at pretty much the same altitude as the photographer. There was a time when we could depend upon the Anhingas to fly by the top floor at 10 o'clock in the morning, but last time I tried then, they weren't there.

Little Blue Herons

Adult Little Blue Heron - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Little Blue Heron

i got two other shots of a Little Blue Heron today, but that first other one nearly blends into a tree it's flying in front of. This one doesn't look all that blue, but it's fairly sharp.

Little Blue Heron - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Little Blue Heron

Flying toward construction over one of the non-free parking lots (I think). This one looks a lot bluer, at least.
 

White Ibis

Adult White Ibis in Tree - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult White Ibis in Tree

even though their beaks curl down, not up, I always get the impression they are smiling, and I almost expect a wink from those clear blue eyes.
 

Snowy Egret

The One Snowy Egret - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

The One Snowy Egret

again, while shooting any bird that half-way presented itself, I got this one Snowy Egret of the day, even though I had not sought one, nor had I expected to — or particularly — wanted to find it. Its head here looks just like Sibley's drawing under the Heron "Courtship Colors" heading in The Sibley Guide to Birds, 2nd Edition, he refers to several color changes from the expected. Legs on Snowy Egrets, among other herons and egrets, turn much lighter than expected. Here, this Snowy is not having it out with another Snowy Egret, or its crown would be way up on its head. Spectacularly way up.

 

 

spring Springing or Ready to Spring
Shot April 21 posted April 23

 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Jump - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved. 107

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Jump into Flight

Must be Spring.

Squirrel on a Burl near The Owls' Nest Now They're Gone - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Squirrel on a Burl near the Nest the Owls Recently Left

We assume the Barred Owl Parents and kits we all so assiduously photographed a couple weeks ago are in the nearest forest learning how to fly in silence and capture food.

Red-shouldered Hawk Mom's Eye Watching Over Her Nest - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Red-shouldered Hawk's Eye Watching Over Her Eggs Not Yet Hatched

Their nest seems to be overflowing at the seams, but the eggs are safe under Mom's watchful eye. All of today's photographs were made out the driver's side window of The Slider. Later, I went for a long walk.

 

 

Visiting Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation in Hutchins, Texas — Again
Photographed April 17 but Posted April 21

Barn Owl with Volunteer at Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Owl on the Arm of Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation Volunteer Karen

While Anna was doing official stuff in delivering the dozen very young Mallards, I wandered around the front and back of the office at Rogers.

Barn Owl Close-up -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Owl Close-up

Just one of many treasures there was this hand-held Barn Owl.

Barn Owl Feet - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Owl Feet

Be sure to notice the sticking-out positioning of the feathers along the bottom of its body. "Rigged for silent running." I didn't get in close to its wings, but in another owl, many years ago, I was able to see their leading edges of its wings were similarly positioned to help keep its flight quiet.

Barn Owl with Rogers Assistant -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

That Same Barn Owl with its Head Titled About 110 Degrees the Other Way

Karen holding the owl. She was very pleasant and happy to show off this fine bird.

 A Dozen Downy Young Mallards - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

A Dozen Downy Young Mallards in a Box with a Towel for a Floor

But these guys were the reason for our trip to Hutchins today. I held them in my lap from the Vet just south of White Rock Lake all the way bumping to Hutchins. We didn't open them up for photographs till we got to Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation, but we could plainly hear them whistling and whispering all along the way.

 Rescued European Starling in Cotton and Microfiber Cloth - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Rescued European Starling in Cotton and Microfiber Cloth

The vet where the rescued birds are left told us this was a Blue Jay, and there was an adult Blue Jay there in another box. But it didn't make it to Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation. The adult Blue Jay had flown into the front of a car, and it did not survive. But this is not a Blue Jay. It's an European Starling, and it took me a long time to pick all that cotton off that tender little bird.

 Rescued Starling in Rogers Volunteer's Hands - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Starling with Most of its Cotton Removed

The volunteer was writing down its official information.

Baby Emu Moving Too Fast - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Emu Chick Moving Too Fast to Get in Focus

Another treasure was this way-too fast-moving Baby Emu.

Roadrunner - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Roadrunner Paused Momentarily Between Going Right and Left

The only time this Roadrunner even approximated slowing down when when it changed from charging right to charging left. Beep-beep.

Caracara in Big Cage - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Crested Caracara

I'd been thinking about Crested Caracaras lately, and here was one just perched there waiting for me to go "click." And this is the best focus I've got on a Caracara in awhile.

Hawk with Crested Caracara -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Red-tailed Hawk with Crested Caracara back

Same or maybe different Caracara in the background, with a hawk with a red tail in the foreground — for the moment.

Hawks Chasing - cpyr

Red-tailed Hawks Chasing in Large Cage
 

Caged Hawk in the Office -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Red-tailed Hawk at Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation

Pretty close, except for a lot of wire.

American Kestrel in a Small Cage -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male American Kestrel in Small Cage

This is about as close as I've ever been to an American Kestrel, although I've photographed them hundreds of times. I feel a kinship, but we've never talked.

Green Heron Between Bars -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Green Heron on Bowl in Cage

I used to only see Green Herons at Green Heron Park (see my bird-annotated map of White Rock Lake), where I have only seen Green Herons twice since they "up-" graded the park.

Caution Area Patrolled By - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Caution: Area Patrolled By

There's almost always a lot of chickens wandering the grounds at Rogers. I often do not photograph them, because, well, they're just chickens. 

Warm-dup Pelican - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Warm Dupp American White Pelican

American White Pelicans have left White Rock Lake but there's often an injured one or two at Rogers. The beak 'fin' indicates that it is — male or female — of the age to breed.

Black Vulture in Large Cage Out Back -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Black Vulture in Big Cage Out Back

I always like to talk with the Black Vultures, who are a lot smarter than the Turkey Vultures, but the Turkey Vultures have better smellers than the Black Vultures, which is why we often see the Blacks following the TVs into where dead things are.

Muscovy Duck Taking Splash Bath - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Muscovy Duck Taking Splash Bath in a Large Cage

There are larger bodies of water in the area behind the office at Rogers Wildlife, but this one's safer — and closer

 Back to Big D -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Coming Back from Hutchins to Dallas

 

 

Visiting What I used to call "Our Lady of the Lake Rookery" in San Antonio, but
now I know it's really "Elmendorf Lake" across the fence from OLL college —
Photographed Friday, April 14 & Posted Monday, April 17

 Multi-species in Close Proximity - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Multi Species in Close Proximity

We've never seen any other bird photographers there, and we've been coming for the last six or seven or maybe more years. This time, a guy asked me if I were having fun, and I told him I really was, and that we came there from Dallas pretty often.

Cattle Egret Lowering Down the Lattice Ladder - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Cattle Egret Lowering Down the Lattice Ladderwork

Looked like it was falling, but it was just descending clumsily.

Attack of the Falling Cattle Egret -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Attack of the Lowering Cattle Egret

But when it finally got positioned just right, it attacked.

Cattle Egrets in Supreme Indifference -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Cattle Egrets in Feigned, Supreme Indifference

But they didn't really fight — not at all with the vehemence of the fierce little Snowy Egrets.

Cattle Egret Pair at Nest -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Cattle Egret Pair at Nest

A few seconds more than three minutes later, I shot almost exactly this same photograph, and they had hardly moved a bit.

Neotropic Cormorants at Nest -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Neotropic Cormorants

The usual Dallas variety of cormorants are so-called "double-crested," but these are somewhat different. According to my treasured Lone Pine edition of Birds of Texas, the "Double-crested Cormorant" has a "larger; thicker body and bill; [the] orange throat patch reaches above eye and is rounded on cheek; no white outline on throat patch or white plume in breeding plumage." Which may mean the cormorant below the upper one in swan-dive mode is a Double-crested, but I don't think so.

Slicked-down, dark Neotropic Cormorant and Flouncy, bright White Great Egret

Dallas' own Southwest Medical School Rookery hides its birds in thickets of dark trees. Elmendorf Lake's rookery is almost all right out in public, although there are a few thickets lower to the hilled ground of that island.

Three Cattles & a Snowy - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Three Cattles and a Snowy Egret

Of the front two Cattle Egrets, one has its crop up, and the other has its crop down.

Cattle and Snowy with Crops Up - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Cattle and Snowy Egret with their Crests [not crops] Up

I have seen older Cattle Egrets with larger and higher crops, but I just liked this fuzzy comparison — especially when I finally realized that the Cattle Egret is actually behind the Snowy Egret…

Great Egret Dinner Delivery - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Great Egret Family Dinner Delivery

The kits waiting anxiously for food. One is obviously bigger and healthier. Note also how much larger the chick on the right is than the other. There may even be an even smaller chick lost in the green here. The biggest one gets the most food and attention, and the other two are only around for insurance in case the big one doesn't make it.

 

 

Barn Swallow Speed-Preening and Cleaning around
in just a few fast seconds — shot April 7 & posted April 16

Barn Swallow 7 -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.  

Barn Swallow 1

One day this week, I visited the lake four times — and I found interesting birds every time. I shot these in very fast succession April 7.

Barnswallow -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Swallow 2

Took several days to decide which of the much longer sequence to keep and work up.

Barn Swallow 3 -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Swallow 3

Several momentary poses looked almost identical.

Barn Swallow 1 - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

[My Favorite] Barn Swallow 4

Then I shot more decent pix and posted them …

Barn Swallow 6 -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Swallow 5

… nearly forgetting these that I had so wanted to post here earlier.

Barnswallow -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Swallow 6

I remember clicking every time it stopped.

Barn Swallow 8 -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Swallow 7

And yesterday, I finally deleted the dupes.

Barn Swallow 9 - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barn Swallow 8

But I just had to show you this rapid-fire sequence of one Barn Swallow preening.

 

 

A Scissor-tailed Flycatcher and a Wood Duck in Action
Photographed April 12 & posted April 15

 Male Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Up Off the Wire - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Up Off the Wire

I was surprised to see another (or maybe the same again) Scissortail so soon again. These were shot through The Slider's driver's side window. If I'd got a sunroof, I might have been more comfortable shooting nearly straight up, and I might have got these a little sharper.

Male Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Catching A Fly - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Catching a Fly

Or some other kinda bug.

About to Land with its Booty - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

About to Land Back Upon the Wire with Its Small, Dark Booty

Maybe it's the slower action that helps make this one look sharper. Maybe something else.

Male Wood Duck on a Log - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Wood Duck on a Log

Not much of anybody else human around this time at Sunset Beach, so I was able to get close enough with a tripod to get pretty detailed shots of this Wood Duck drake who took a long time preening.

Male Wood Duck Preening - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Wood Duck Preening on a Log

 

 

Mostly shot from my new $209, Canon ELPH 360 I got to have a
Wider-angle in my Pocket — Shot Tuesday & posted April 13

 Sunset Bay from Greater Sunset Bay - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Sunset Bay from Greater Sunset Bay

This first photograph — and the last one — in today's journal entry — are from my usual full-frame Nikon with a fairly long tele lens. And the rest are from my new cheapo Canon. I wondered if I could tell which were from which camera. To my understanding "Greater Sunset Bay" is the mostly dry and treed and sometimes creeked portions of the area from the actual wet lake and bay out to Buckner Boulevard (Loop 12) on one end and Garland Rd. on the other.

Homes for Wayward Birds - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Homes for Wayward Birds

After seeing all the hollowed logs ripped open by recent storms, I've been paying more attention to holes in trees where birds might live. This is the first of the rest of the Canon pix.

Some Other Photographer on Winfrey Meadow - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Some Other Photographer on Winfrey Meadow

I couldn't see what he was photographing, but the stance looked familiar.

Pink Primrose CU - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Pink Primrose Close-Up

The Canon has no Electronic Viewfinder, just the LCD on the back that is not always WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get), and for this shot it showed a way too bright image that in no way resembles this one. I can't do close-ups with my telephoto lens, but if I set this one right and believe that I have actually set it right, even if it, in no way, shows that I have, I sometimes can with this camera. This is what it might look like one of those times when I get all those rights right.

Stormy Sky - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Stormy Sky

This scene looked pretty close to what we see here. Sometimes I have to outguess this camera's output. Sometimes not. Every camera has its quirks. I guess after being a photographer for 53 years, I can outguess some and get fooled entirely by others.

Three Ducks and The Sun Going Down Behind Sunset Bay - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Three Ducks and The Sun Going Down

The view in the LCD was very much like this.

The Pier at Sunset Bay - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

People & Their Dogs & Kids on The Pier at Sunset Bay

People bring their kids to "feed the ducks," which often include Coots, gooses and other birds, who do not include actual ducks. They also often bring their dogs, never quite realizing that most birds are afraid of dogs and are less likely to stay close when they are near.

Sunset with Red Flare - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Sunset with Red Flare

I can usually depend on my 300mm lens not to flare up. But rather obviously, the lens on the ELPH 360 isn't as well corrected. Though it still render views that look amazing.

Y They Call It Sunset Bay - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Y They Call It Sunset Bay

I've used that same caption — only I spelled out the first word — previously and on a photograph with full tonality. Not always, but sometimes you get what you pay for with cheap camera's cheap optics.

Northern Shoveler in Sunset Bay - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Northern Shoveler in the Ripples just off Sunset Beach

Neither of these full tele "12X optical zoom" as it says on the camera is as good as my other camera and my usual lens, but they're still not half bad.

Breeding Male Northern Shoveler - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Breeding Adult Male Northern Shoveler

Who is actually a little more colorful than this brownish image seems to show. But this image still has its elegance.

Cut & Shredded Storm-ravaged Trees - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Storm Ravaged Trees Cut & Piled Up

And, once again, this last shot was taken with my full-frame rather more expensive camera and long and very sharp telephoto lens. I think I can tell the differences. Can you?

 

 

Around the lake looking for photo-worthy birds — and finding many…
Shot Tuesday April 11, and posted very early April 12

Blue Jay in a Tree - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.  

In a Tree There's a Blue Jay

No idea where was this blue jay looking less like a Blue Jay than usual.

Then He Flies Away - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Then He Flew Away

I always want to capture the classic Blue Jay look, but luckily, every time I photograph one or more of them, I capture them differently.

FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

F.O.S. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

As seen on the upper portion of Winfrey Hill in a meadow that soon will be teaming with flycatchers and other hungry birds.

Stream-lined and Very Colorful - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Streamlined Fast and Just So Colorful

I panned along and shot three times. This was the best of the bunch.

Big Tree Uprooted -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Big Tree Up-rooted

This was the biggest — not necessarily the tallest — tree that got knocked over in the big, nasty, storm couple weeks ago in and around White Rock Lake.

Ripples and Reflections -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Ripples, Reeds, Branches & Reflections

Across the lagoon off Sunset Beach. No birds or animals but some kind a blue tube with writing on it I still haven't investigated. What I like about this scene is the title under the picture above.

Grackle Dance on Rabbit Hill -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Grackle Dance Up Rabbit Hill

The rabbits don't show that often, only at nights in early and mid spring, but there's always grackles there and everywhere else. Sometimes they went into their heads up display that generally means a fight with someone close. Here they're just fooling around. That's the asphalt road they're standing on.

The road that used to go to the Dreyfuss Building that's not there anymore, because the Fire Department couldn't find it, even they knew right where the Winfrey Building was. I suspect there's a lot of human kissing and touching up toward the end of the road and the area that looks off into downtown Dallas and the other side of Sunset Bay.

Twisted & Broken -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Twisted & Broken

That branch that's not just twisted off the tree that used to be in base part, but that I'm afraid The City will do something, so it's not any part of the tree that it still is an important part of.

I drove around the lake three times this day. When I finally find my little $209 Canon, I'll add the best of those shots and the several shots of the Coot getting away from whatever held it down too long near the point of Winfrey Point…

 

 

Around the lake looking for photo-worthy birds — and finding many…
No idea when I shot these, but I posted them the afternoon of April 10.

Portrait of an American Coot -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.  

Portrait of an American Coot

Coots are difficult to expose correctly, because of the differences in tonalities between their dark black heads and their brilliant white beaks, not to even mention those dark red eyes. Once in a while, even I get it right. As often here — but not always, these images are presented in strict chronological order, although I'm not at all sure why that should even matter.

I've Been Collecting These -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

I've Been Collecting These

Lots of hollowed-out trees — and many others — got too torqued by the wind in last week's (from when I shot this last, last week) storm. See why so many birds find homes in those old trees?

Male Mallards Fighting on Sunset Beach - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Mallards Fighting on Sunset Beach

I took my own sweet time advancing ever so slowly upon this pair of angry ducks.

Male Mallards Fighting on Sunset Beach - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Mallards Fighting on Sunset Beach

I was hoping for color and flash. Instead, I got near abstraction, which I always greatly admire.

Male Mallards Fighting on Sunset Beach - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Mallards Fighting on the Edge

Then along came another photographer, totally unaware of the many long minutes it took me, tiny short steps at a time, advancing down the hill, getting ever closer to the fighters.

Mallard vs. Mallard Splash - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Mallard vs. Mallard Splash

And scared them away by charging down to where he could fill his frame. None of these images filled mine.

Northern Shoveler Preening -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Northern Shoveler Preening

I don't think I'll ever get enough of bird abstractions.

That Same Shoveler -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

That Same Shoveler

And I love me my Snorkers.

And that same Shoveler Again -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

And One More Time

This one of whom then stuck out its left foot for a long, soothing leg stretch.

Female Mallard Detail -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Female Mallard Detail

Abstract in their beauty.

Coot Abstraction -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Coot Abstraction

And theirs, too.

Cormorant Fly-over - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Cormorant Flyover

It needs a little more light, but it probably would not agree.

Upended Turtle on Lower Steps - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Upended Turtle on Lower Steps

I wanted to go down there and flip it back over. Then I thought of all those young guys I photograph down there, with their amazing balance and speed, and I thought much better of the notion. It was not moving.

 

 

Signs of Spring: Snowies on the Spillway & Grackles @ Sunset Bay
Photographed in the ayem of April 7 & Posted Later that evening

 Lunging Breeding Snowy Egret - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Breeding Snowy Egret Lunges

I'd noticed a gathering of socializing Snowy Egrets on the Middle Spillway when I saw this guy lunging at nobody in particular. Showing off, I guess. Snowies tend to do that. They're a feisty lot.

A Low Flight of Snowing Heading Up The Spillway - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

A Low Flight of Snowy Egrets Heading Up The Spillway

As a couple of coots watch.

Snowies Away - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Snowies Away!

My Flying egret skills had really got rusty over the long winter and spring.

Great Blue Heron with Too Much Branch - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Great Blue Heron with Too Much Branch

Not at all sure why it would want that branch, but it seemed to be a real prize for it. 

Male Great-tailed Grackle in Heat - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.  

Male Great-tailed Grackle in Heat

That's the female on the right.

She and the Monster -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

She & The Monster

Every spring I attempt to capture Great-tailed Grackle in the throes of lust.

Tail-dragging Suitor -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Tail-dragging Suitor and Suitee

Today — this morning — I finally captured some of the body shapes these amazing birds acquire when they're in full mating mode.

Male Grackle Alone - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Minor Male Monster Mode

This, however, is only a minor show of lust. There's a much more elusive, full monster mode the males grackles get into that I still hope to capture. I've seen it a couple times this week, but by the time I get the camera out and ready, it's gone.

 

 

Male Red-shouldered Hawk Near their Nest
Photographed April 3, Posted April 5, 2017

 Male Red-shouldered Hawk Rousing - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Red-shouldered Hawk Rousing

This has got to be one of my better bird rousing photographs. See my Birds Rousing page for many more and a better understanding of the term, "rouse," which has to do with the fact that every bird with feathers is able to move any or all of the feathers on its body.

Male Red-shouldered Hawk Flashing His Feathers -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Red-shouldered Hawk Flashing His Feathers

Probably getting those wings ready to do some flying.

Male Red-shouldered Hawk Dropping Into Flight -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Red-shouldered Hawk Drops into Flight

According to my Lone Pine edition of Birds of Texas, "Preferring wetter habitats than the closely related Broad-winged Hawk and Red-tailed Hawk, the Red-shouldered Hawk nests in mature trees, usually around river bottoms and in lowland tracks of woods alongside creeks."

Red-shouldered Hawk Flying - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Red-shouldered Hawk Flying

I know he is a he, because that same Birds of Texas book says "Pair builds a bulky nest of sticks and twigs or reuses an old nest; female incubates 2-4 darkly blotched, bluish white eggs for about 33 days."

Lackadasical Squirrel in Tree -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Lackadaisical Squirrel Watching Me

I was careful not to get too close. In fact, to get the lens to focus, I had to take three giant steps back, and I felt much safer back there.

Wood Duck Drake on one of 17 Turtles -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Wood Duck Drake atop one of Seventeen Turtles

I appreciate inter-species images. The dark bird near the Wood Duck in the middle is an American Coot, and the bird at the far left end is ahh… oh, probably some other duck.

Wood Duck Drake with up-verted Crown -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Wood Duck on one of Seventeen Turtles

Note his inverted — or is that UP-verted — crown, which I've never seen a Wood Duck exhibit before. Neato-keeno! I didn't notice it when I photographed it, but would love to see it closer and from the front some time.

Close-up of Male Wood Duck on Turtles -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved. \

Close-up of Male Wood Duck on Turtles

And another sharp crop of a similar, king-of-the-world image.

Red-eared Slider -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Red-eared Slider

I named my car "The Slider" after the Red-earred Slider, even though it is neither green nor splotched with algae, which is fairly common on wild turtles, but that fuzzy stuff freaks out turtle pet owners, as I've just read from a whole page of worries. It also doesn't have a red "ear" lengthwise along the side of its head, although I've always wanted to paint the backs of the exterior rear-view mirrors red, so I could more easily pick it out among all those other white Priuses in a parking lot.

One of These Exactly - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

One of These, Exactly

I'm assuming it's some sort of Flycatcher. But though I've looked at all of them in my Birds of Texas, I have not yet identified it.

Ah! There it is in Texas Flycatchers and Their Kin on Two Shutterbirds. It must be an Eastern Kingbird. I thought it looked familiar. It's just about time for the Kingbirds to come flying back into our lives.

 

 

Barred Owls & Owlets High in Tall Trees
Photographed April 2, Posted April 3, 2017

Downy Young Framed by Twigs - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Downy Young Barred Owl Framed by Twigs

Earlier Sunday afternoon, there wasn't much light under the cloudy sky, but we photographed anyway. Later, when the sky turned a little blue, there was more light with its accompanying shadows, which were entirely missing in these top three images. I'd heard yesterday that the next generation of owls were out of their nest, but I couldn't find them. Today, they were rather obvious, once one separated owls from trees, which is never really very easy.

Downy Young Barred Owl in Tree - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Downy Young Barred Owl in Tree

On site, it was difficult to tell the adults from the juveniles, at least partially because many of the owls were back-lighted and apparently much darker than you see them here. And there was a variety of mixed information about the ages of the Barred Owls in the trees above. I generally photograph the best I can on site, then figure out who's who when I get them on this page.

One or more of the owlets are probably portrayed in today's journal entry more than once. But I don't know which. They don't really all look alike, but I don't know them well enough to differentiate among them yet. Just separating them from the trees and leaves was a major accomplishment. Most of the photographers present stayed in one of two or three places. I was all over the place trying to get clear views through the branches.

Adult Barred Owl - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Barred Owlet

Once my photographs were worked up in my elderly, pre-subscription Photoshop CS5, it became obvious that the owls without stripes on their fronts were owlets.

Unfortunately, this one has turned its head twisted back 165 degrees or so and is looking down over its striped back at us. So what I originally labeled as an adult, is actually a fuzzy juvenile. Note the gray fuzz near the bottom left of it and the full white rim around the sides of its eyes, where adults Barred Owls have stripes (bars).

Anna and I had only planned to stay a little while, then go off to Keller's on Garland Road for one of their wonderful and inexpensive hamburgers. Coming back, we saw sunlight in the clouds, so we hied over to the lake, hoping the light would last.

Adult Barred Owl in Sunshine -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Barred Owl in Sunshine

And we found plenty of light in some areas. And yes, this owl and the next one down are both the same species. Just this one was in bright sunlight, and the next was in muted shadows, so the bar colors seem different, but really are not. Probably, the reason this owl is squinting, is because there's much more light in its eyes.

Adult Barred Owl in Sunshine -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Adult Barred Owl in Muted Sunshine

All totaled, there were — near as I could figure — two adult owls and three recently-hatched owlets.

Downy Young Barred Owl - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Downy Young Barred Owl

And every time I moved to get a different angle, I'd forget where was that little blot of gray and brown  up in the tangle of tree. Aha! This is at least one of the duplicates. I'm recognizing the pattern of branches here. The other one is up here.

Downy Young Barred Owl - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Downy Young Barred Owl

Waiting for this one to turn around and face the photographers took the longest time, and this was the closest to that optimum stance as it got while I watched.

 

 

Bill J Boyd's photo of Great Horned Owls in Austin,
Anna Palmer's pic of an injured Eastern Screech Owl &
Kala King's pix of a Pair of Cooper's Hawks @ White Rock Lake

Bill J Boyd - Great Horned Owl and Young

Bill J Boyd   Great Horned Owl and Owlet 
Above the entrance to the Lady Bird Wildflower Center in Austin

Bill J Boyd, who "spends a lot of time at Sunset Bay photographing pelicans," is the Owl Docent at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, where he took this photograph. He said, "A Great Horned Owl has nested just above the entrance to Lady Bird Wildflower Center in Austin for eight consecutive years. … Mama owl got on the nest February 9. The baby owlet is about 2-weeks old, and this was the first time it could see over the planter ledge where the nest is. The owlets will not fledge until late April. Come down and photograph if you get a chance."

More information about this adult Great Horned Owl, called Athena is on the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center's site.

Anna Palmer - Eastern Screech Owl Rescue

Anna Palmer   Eastern Screech Owl Rescue on the Way to Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation

Anna Palmer organizes Dallas' Bird Chauffeurs — comprising 7–10 volunteers who pick up injured or orphaned birds from Dallas Veterinarian CityVet/CityPet's White Rock location, then delivers them to Rogers Wildlife Rehabilitation in Hutchins [just south of Dallas off I-45]. Anna said this "owl was found on the ground in the rescuer's yard." and that "Rogers has two more Screech Owls that have been delivered there recently. They are fed chopped mice." She sent a photo of the mice chopped, but I decided not to use it.

If you find an injured or orphaned bird, deliver it Monday through Saturday to CityVet/CityPet's White Rock location. They'll give it minimal dry food and no water. Contact info and map on their site.

 Female Cooper's Hawk Eating Her Food Gift - Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Kala King   Female Cooper's Hawk Eating Her Food Gift

Kala said this was "the female eating prey the male brought."

She also said. "Once the tree leafs out, [I] hope there is still a good window to it where the babies can be seen [and photographed]. I didn't take a photo this week of the nest itself because I was much more interested in what they were doing, and when he flew to the nest, I would have disturbed her to get close, so since I had plenty of shots of her eating without disturbing her, I quietly backed away so she could finish her meal. I think it was either rabbit or squirrel, it was red meat. I didn't see feathers, and for sure it was not fish."

Kala King's Photo of Pair of Cooper's Hawks

Kala King   Female and Male Cooper's Hawk

When Kala sent these pictures, she said the female "was not sitting on eggs yet." I say getting both members of a pair together in one photo is always amazing.

Male Breaking Off Nest Stick -Photograph Copyright 2017 JRCompton.com/birds   All Rights Reserved.

Male Cooper's Hawk Breaking Off Stick for the Nest

I've often seen these nest sticks called "Nuptial Gifts" to the mate, although officially, probably only the first one is of specific ceremonial value, and unless we're counting sticks in a particular nest from before it becomes a nest, it's difficult to determine which was the first one. I used to get excited about photographing what I thought was that first one.

 


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Except as noted, all text and photographs Copyright 2017 & before by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No reproduction in any medium without specific written permission from and payment to Writer and Photographer J R Compton. I am an amateur. I've only been birding since June 2006, and the best of that is documented in this Journal, all the pages of which continue online — see links at top and bottom of every Bird Journal page. I've been photographing professionally and semi-professionally yet always amateurishly since 1964. A total of 53 years.

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